Last edited by Mijas
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

1 edition of An Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Thurmaston, Leicestershire found in the catalog.

An Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Thurmaston, Leicestershire

Philip W. Williams

An Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Thurmaston, Leicestershire

by Philip W. Williams

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  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Leicestershire Museums, Art Galleries and Records Service in Leicester .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination79 p.
Number of Pages79
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24718743M

A short guide to the Parish of St Michael & All Angels, Thurmaston. Extracts from the 3 rd Edition, May – by kind permission of the author, Rev T. Robin Martin, Vicar of Thurmaston THE PARISH OF THURMASTON is bounded by the River Soar to the west, above The Roundhill Academy to the north, to the east by a line across the fields, the south behind Manor Road (city boundary).   In April an Anglo Saxon cemetery of around graves holding beautiful grave goods was unearthed in Bulford, Wiltshire. And now, another cemetery has been discovered with 55 .

Iron Age settlement; established as 'Civitas' by the Romans; Cathedral see of the Bishop of Leicester until the 9th century when it became a Danish borough. It was the site of the first Parliament called by Simon de Montfort, in , and an early centre of the dissenting tradition; from the 18th century it was dependent on the hosiery and boot. Thurmaston and its history. Originally known as Turmodestone, according to an entry in the Domesday Book of , the village later became Thurmaston. It’s believed to have been named after an Anglo Saxon chief by the name of Turmod and split into two communities – the south being Saxon and the north Viking in origin.

The excavations at Buckland, Dover, uncovered another graves in the extensive Anglo-Saxon cemetery first excavated by Professor Vera Evison in Just over two thirds of the burials contained grave goods. Several male burials contained a swo. An Iron Age settlement was unearthed just to the north of Wanlip and an Anglo-Saxon cemetery was discovered during the building of Longslade School in , One of the earliest mentions of Wanlip is in Domesday book, where it is listed as Anelepe, among the lands given to Earl Aubrey by the King. The land described includes a mill.


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An Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Thurmaston, Leicestershire by Philip W. Williams Download PDF EPUB FB2

The church is the site of an Anglo-Saxon cemetery. Saxelby. Saxelbie: King's land. Thurmaston. Turmodestone: Hugh de Grandmesnil and William from him. Mill. Part of Leicester; the county's second largest town in the Middle Ages. Wigston Parva.

Wicestan. An archaeological evaluation on land between Foxton and West Langton, near Market Harborough, Leicestershire, located up to seven Anglo-Saxon inhumation graves, representing part of a larger.

Williams, P., W., An Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Thurmaston, Leicestershire. Leicester: Leicestershire Museums Art Galleries and Records Service.

by Peter Liddle INTRODUCTION Between and during the construction of Longslade School, Anglo-Saxon material was discovered on several occasions. The evidence suggests that only part of a much larger group of material, constituting a Pagan Anglo-Saxon cemetery, was recovered.

Anglo‐Saxon cremation cemetary at Thurmaston, Leicestershire Williams, Philip W. Leicestershire Museusm, Art Galleries and Records Service 8 3 Anglo‐Saxon landscapes in the East Midlands Bourne, Jill (Ed.) Leicestershire Museums Arts and Records Service 6 2 Anglo‐Saxon Leicestershire and Rutland The site of the Anglo-Saxon cemetery of Empingham II lies within the ecclesiastical parish of Empingham, until part of Rutland, and since in Leicestershire (Fig 1).

Located in the western part of the parish, approximately km from the present village, the site is now landscaped into the Sykes Lane car-park bordering Rutland Water, a man.

The success of the THG book Memories of Thurmaston - has led to demands for a second volume of memories. Memories of Thurmaston, Volume 2, is priced at a value for money £ and available from Thurmaston Print Shop,Melton Road, Thurmaston, Leicester, LE4 8BE, England.

(Shop open Tuesday to Friday 9am - 5pm) or can be posted in the UK. Two Anglo Saxon Urns From the Anglo Saxon Cemetery, Humberstone Lane, Thurmaston. Mid 5th to mid 6th Century During the excavation in and later, urns were recovered.

Many were virtually complete or could be reconstructed. Some were decorated and. ab kettleby (st. james) churchyard anstey cemetery asfordby (all saints) churchyard ashby-de-la-zouch cemetery aston flamville (st.

peter) churchyard bagworth (holy rood) churchyard bardon hill (st. peter) churchyard barkby cemetery barrow-upon-soar cemetery billesdon cemetery birstall (st.

james) churchyard birstall cemetery bitteswell (st. Leicester / ˈ l ɛ s t ər / is a city and unitary authority area in the East Midlands of England, and the county town of city lies on the River Soar and close to the eastern end of the National Forest. It is to the north-east of Birmingham and Coventry, south of Nottingham, and west of Peterborough.

The mid year estimate of the population of the City of Leicester. The cemetery contained graves, arranged in a deliberate plan with an entrance to the south. One of the graves was covered by a low burial mound.

One burial was that of a high-status woman laid on a bed, and with her were found three spectacular gold brooches. In fact, they are tucked away in Leicestershire, inside a small village church perched high up on a hill.

They are, without a doubt, the crème-de-la-crème of known stone work from the eighth and 10th centuries, when the Midland counties formed the heart of Mercia, a kingdom that had a reckoning throughout Europe. THURMASTON - LOCKDOWN JULY Most of you will have read posts from news feeds concerning the Lockdown of Leicester and locally.

Thurmaston does not have a spike in numbers of Covid The outbreak is in the North East of Leicester with cases for every(the County's average is 60). An Anglo-Saxon Inhumanation Burial from Lutterworth, Leicestershire by Peter Liddle In May Leicestershire County Council were undertaking a road widening scheme on Watling Street near Lutterworth.

Parish: Thurmaston; Brick memorial hall with two tablets bearing incised inscription on front elevation (one beside door, one above) and in the interior, 12 individual.

Anglo-Saxon cemeteries have been found in England, Wales and Scotland. The burial sites date primarily from the fifth century to the seventh century AD, before the Christianisation of Anglo-Saxon Anglo-Saxon period cemeteries have been found with graves dating from the.

Walton is Anglo-Saxon in origin and is believed to mean 'farm of the Britons' or 'Saxon settlement'. Even before the Romans and the Saxons were present, there was a Celtic settlement here.

The Anglo-Saxon word for the Celtic inhabitants who lived here then is 'Wealas'. Over the years Walton had many large houses with surrounding estates. Leicester Archaeology Monographs No. A project sponsored by the local authorities of Derbyshire, Derby, Leicestershire, Leicester, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Nottingham and Rutland, the University of Leicester and English Heritage.

Another book published last year sheds even more light on later Anglo-Saxon era – the latest volume in Barrie Cox's meticulous study of the place-names of Leicestershire [4]. This discusses in great detail the origins of the settlement and field names in the East Goscote hundred, which contains all.

Burial in Early Anglo-Saxon England refers to the grave and burial customs followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the mid 5th and 11th centuries CE in Early Mediaeval variation of practice performed by the Anglo-Saxon peoples during this period, included the use of both cremation and is commonality in the burial places between the rich and poor - their resting places.

South Thurmaston is a village and a parish in eastern Leicestershire. The parish is miles north of London, miles southeast of Syston, and 6 miles east-north-east from Leicester city.

The parish covers 1, acres. If you are planning a visit: By automobile, there are several approaches off either the A46 or A47 out of Leicester city.For all book order enquiries and to place an order: Tel: +44 (0) Fax: +44 (0) E: [email protected] Post: Oxbow Books 47 Church Street Barnsley, S70 2AS.

For all general enquiries: Tel: +44 (0) Fax: +44 (0) E: [email protected] Please note: the appearance of books on our website does not. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle has preserved a glimpse of these years of chaos in its records of “a great heathen army” that pillaged East Anglia in the year Between and the Northmen widened their field for plunder and tribute to East Mercia.

Leicester was attacked inpartly destroying the ancient Roman city walls.